Category Archive: Congenital Heart

2021 ANNUAL REPORT WEBINAR VIDEOS NOW UP ON THE SITE!

If you missed our fantastic 2021 Annual Report webinar “The Way We Were: Lessons for Service Redesign” on Wednesday 24 November, now is your chance to catch it. You can access all the videos on our brand new Youtube channel or via the individual speaker links on our web page.

The report highlights the state of play just as we entered the COVID-19 pandemic. Since then, so much has happened. Many care pathways were disrupted whilst resources were diverted to maintaining or creating new services for emergency and urgent cases. The pandemic continues but in a different form following the vaccination programme. Integrated care systems, hospital and ambulance trusts are collectively dealing with the consequences, and establishing work programmes to deal with current requirements as well as the backlog.

The lessons of the NCAP prior to the pandemic are all highly relevant to the on-going re-design of services. Around 150 people joined us to explore what is shown by the audit data, and what we have learned from this challenging period. There is also a half hour session from Dominique Allwood of UCL Partners on using data and Quality Improvement methods to implement improvement.

NICOR publishes National Cardiac Audit Programme (NCAP) Annual Report 2021

NICOR has today (14 October 2021) published the National Cardiac Audit Programme Annual Report for 2021.

The report, called “The Way We Were: A Pre-Pandemic Stocktake to Help the Recovery” summarises key findings from the National Cardiac Audit Programme (NCAP) based on data collected between 1st April 2019 and 31st March 2020 (or between 2017 and 2020 for those analyses requiring three years’ consecutive data). Trends in data from 2010/11 are provided where appropriate to provide a comprehensive stocktake of progress and continuing challenges from the decade prior to the pandemic. As such, it represents the state of play up to the point we were just entering the national COVID-19 pandemic (the first lockdown occurring on the 23rd March 2020).

The Annual Report is accompanied by supporting reports from all the six domains covered by the audit programme and a dedicated Annual Report for Patients, Carers and the Public, which was co-written by NICOR patient representatives Sarah Brown and Richard Corder.

Domain Reports

National Adult Cardiac Surgery Audit (NACSA) 2021 Summary Report

National Audit of Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (NAPCI) 2021 Summary Report

National Audit of Cardiac Rhythm Management (NACRM) Devices and Ablation 2021 Summary Report

National Congenital Heart Disease Audit (NCHDA) 2021 Summary Report

National Heart Failure Audit (NHFA) 2021 Summary Report

Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project (MINAP) 2021 Summary Report

 

National Data Opt Out Policy compliance deadline extended to 31 July 2022

The deadline for the National Data Opt Out policy has been extended again, to 31 July 2022.  The information on the NHS DIgital page still gives 31 March 2022 but this will be updated in the next few days, as of today (29/03/22). We received this communication from the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) yesterday:

‘The mandatory implementation of the National Data Opt-Out (NDOO), deadline of 31 March 2022, has been extended until 31 July 2022. We do not intend to extend implementation of the deadline any further.

 As set out in the Operational Policy Guidance, the opt-out applies to the disclosure of confidential patient information for purposes beyond an individual’s direct care across the health and care system in England, unless an exemption has been granted. 

If you have any further questions please contact nationaldataopt-out@nhsx.nhs.uk.

https://www.hqip.org.uk/news/update-on-national-data-opt-out/#.YkM2qefMJPYhttps://digital.nhs.uk/services/national-data-opt-out

 

 

Congenital cardiac surgery survival rate continues to improve for children in the UK and Republic of Ireland

Data published today by the National Congenital Heart Disease Audit (NCHDA) shows that survival 30 days after paediatric cardiac surgery for children with congenital heart disease has continued to improve for children in recent years and is currently close to 98%. After consideration of case complexity, survival 30 days after heart surgery for children was either at the expected level or better than predicted in each of the paediatric centres providing care.

Dr. Rodney Franklin, NICOR’s Clinical Lead for the NCHDA said:

“Overall survival after congenital heart procedures in UK and Republic of Ireland remains good and as high as reported anywhere in the world.”

The report also highlights that antenatal ultrasound scan detection rates of congenital heart conditions have improved year on year between 2003 and 2016 from 36.1% to 50.4%, however there is continued room for improvement by targeting sonographer training to regions performing less well.

Dr. Rodney Franklin said: “Antenatal detection is very important because advance warning that a child has a congenital heart problem leads to better planned care after birth, often with improved survival and fewer complications following treatment. The audit is working closely with Public Health England to improve detection in this area.”

The NCHDA collected data following 33,754 congenital heart surgical operations and transcatheter interventional procedures performed in 34 hospitals, including all 14 specialist paediatric units, between 2013 and 2016 in the UK and the Republic of Ireland (RoI). Other key findings from the report include:

During 2015-16, the most recent year, 10,887 therapeutic procedures were carried out, of which 7,695 were on children and 3,192 were on adults; the number of therapeutic cardiac procedures undertaken annually has risen by over 40% between 2003 and 2016, and furthermore additional novel interventions have been introduced, the outcomes of which are reported here for the first time.

Risk adjusted full programme 30-day postsurgical survival at all 14 centres undertaking cardiovascular procedures in children and young people below 16 years of age was within acceptable predicted control limits, with a trend of continuing year on year improvement.

Survival at 30 days after all 72 major surgical and cardiovascular interventions undertaken to treat congenital heart disease at any age was good in all centres, with a single procedural exception at two centres.

The NCHDA, now in its 17th year, is managed by the National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) and is the largest and most comprehensive national audit of its kind in the world. The audit collects data from all centres undertaking congenital cardiac surgery and interventional procedures in the UK (since 2000) and RoI (since 2012).

NCHDA is commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership as part of the National Clinical Audit and Patient Outcomes Programme (NCAPOP) and clinically led by the British Congenital Cardiac Association and The Society for Cardiothoracic Surgery in Great Britain and Ireland.

The full analyses can be accessed via the National Congenital Heart Disease Audit portal

Independent Review of Children’s Cardiac Services: NCHDA Recommendations

Bristol Review publishes final report
The Independent Review of Children’s Cardiac Services in Bristol published its final report on 1/7/2016. The full report is available to download via the website.

Commissioned by NHS England Medical Director Sir Bruce Keogh in 2014, and chaired by Eleanor Grey QC, the Bristol Review is an independent review of the safety and quality of children’s cardiac services in Bristol. The report contains recommendations relating to the NCHDA in relation to the outlier policy including:

  • the development of guidance for centres on how to respond to notification of potential outlier status and
  • specific attention to the need for publication of the responses to outlier alerts, and of any actions taken as a result

We welcome the recommendations and recognize the importance of clear guidance and communication.

A full description of the outlier process including timelines and guidance for hospital staff will be available shortly as part of an updated guidance on Data Quality. The guidance will also include a clear process for how the hospital response is reviewed and quality of care assured. All responses will be published on the NICOR website.

30 Day Survival Rates Following Congenital Heart Disease Surgery Published Today

The National Congenital Heart Disease Audit (NCHDA) has today published the 2011/14 annual analysis. The findings are based on data submitted by combined 14 paediatric and 20 centres who only undertake procedures in adults with congenital heart disease. This covers all NHS and private paediatric and congenital heart disease procedures undertaken at centres in the UK and Republic of Ireland. Analyses are based on 31,511 paediatric and congenital heart surgery and interventions undertaken between April 1st 2011 and March 31st 2014.

  • Survival at 30-days after each of the 56 surgical and transcatheter cardiovascular interventions most frequently undertaken to treat congenital heart disease in children, young people and adults continues to be within the appropriate limits and not below the red alert limit.
  • For the 56 specific procedures used as a basis of inter‐unit comparison, there was one warning level outliers for paediatric cardiac surgery at a single centre and none for paediatric intervention, adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) surgery and ACHD intervention. The hospital concerned has been contacted by NICOR and the relevant professional societies, and the centre’s response is available on the NCHDA portal.
  • Analysis of the 30 day post procedural outcomes for all hospitals shows an upward trend in survival in the most recent 18 months. The overall 30 day survival for all congenital heart disease procedures is extremely high and indeed one of the highest reported anywhere in the world.
  • Antenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease has gradually improved over the past 8 years. In 2013/14, approaching 45% of infants who required a procedure to treat a congenital heart malformation in the first year of life were diagnosed through antenatal screening, compared to less than a quarter of cases in 2003/4.

To download the Annual Report and reports from previous years please go to this page:

Pre 2017 data and back issues of reports

30 Day Survival Rates Following Congenital Heart Disease Surgery and Interventional Procedures

The National Congenital Heart Disease Audit (NCHDA) has today published the 2010/13 annual analysis. The analysis covers 22,979 congenital heart operations and transcatheter interventional procedures undertaken across 34 UK centres, including all 14 specialist paediatric units, between 2010 and 2013. Key findings include:

  • Survival at 30-days after each of the 56 surgical and transcatheter cardiovascular interventions most frequently undertaken to treat congenital heart disease in children, young people and adults continues to be within the appropriate limits and not below the red alert limit.
  • For the 56 specific procedures used as a basis of inter‐unit comparison, there was one warning level outliers for paediatric cardiac surgery at a single centre and none for paediatric intervention, adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) surgery and ACHD intervention. The hospital concerned has been contacted by NICOR and the relevant professional societies, and the centre’s response is available on the NCHDA portal.
  • Analysis of the 30 day post procedural outcomes for all hospitals shows an upward trend in survival in the most recent 18 months. The overall 30 day survival for all congenital heart disease procedures is extremely high and indeed one of the highest reported anywhere in the world.
  • Antenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease has gradually improved over the past 8 years. In 2013/14, approaching 45% of infants who required a procedure to treat a congenital heart malformation in the first year of life were diagnosed through antenatal screening, compared to less than a quarter of cases in 2003/4.

https://nicor5.nicor.org.uk/CHD/an_paeds.nsf/vwContent/home?Opendocument

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